Clermont Forum II, Artist Profile 11: Jamea Richmond-Edwards

 

Girl Holding A  Book by Jamea Richmond-Edwards

Girl Holding A Book by Jamea Richmond-Edwards

Girl Holding A  Book by Jamea Richmond-Edwards at Clermont Forum II presented by the Rotating History Project

Girl Holding A Book by Jamea Richmond-Edwards at Clermont Forum II presented by the Rotating History Project

Come check out Jamea Richmond- Edwards 2014  mixed media piece “Girl Holding A Book” at the Closing of The Clermont Forum II: Interpreting Clermont’s History Through Art, when the exhibit opens to the public again on May 31 from 3-7.

Jamea had the following to say about her work “The young woman holds a school book that represents education. Education is carrying the African American community  towards its ideals and progress. This painting represents the future of the communities. The piece was inspired by the photograph of the pupil in front of the Josephine City School.”

This will be the closing event of Clermont Forum II and will include artist talks by Todd R. Forsgren, Elizabeth Crisman, Anne Bouie, Carrie Fucile, Doug Pifer (Doug will also speak to the history of scarecrows). Artist talks will run about 15 min each and will take place from 3-5:45. There will also be storytelling and sharing from former Clermont residents Geneva Jackson and Tom Peyton starting at 6pm.

About: Jamea Richmond-Edwards

Detroit-bred Jamea Richmond-Edwards graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Art degree from Jackson State University in 2004 where she studied painting and drawing.  She went on to earn a MFA from Howard University in 2012.

Jamea is inspired by the black figures of artist Kerry James Marshall and drawings of Charles White. She offers a repertoire of portraits of black women drawn using ink and graphite.   Her lionized figures are portrayed in regal poses, with eyes that possess alluring gazes and bodies adored with rich tapestries of color and patterns made of sequins, rhinestones, paper and textiles.  Their clothing, which mimics designer fashion, conceals their vulnerability and weaknesses, while elevating them from the distained to the revered.

Richmond-Edward’s work has garnered the attention of art critics such as the Washington Post’s Michael Sullivan, who in a January ,2013 review of the exhibition “No Strings Attached,” described Jamea’s portraits of two black women to be “among the most arresting pieces” in the show.  In February, 2013 she was included in the Huffington Post’s “Black Artists: 30 Contemporary Art Makers Under 40 You Should Know”.

Jamea has exhibited her artwork nationally and internationally including the Delaware Art Museum Centennial Exhibition, Wilmington, Delaware; Rush Arts Corridor Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; Parish Gallery, Washington, D.C. and Galerie Myrtis, Baltimore, Maryland.  Her works are in the permanent collection of private collectors across the country and the Embassy of the United States in Dakar Senegal.

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